Good morning! Today let’s talk about financial crises. Life is full of ups and downs and you never know when you might find yourself suddenly underwater.  Instead of sinking or swimming, let’s talk about staying afloat… if you choose to learn from my mistakes.

See, during my first 10 years of business, we made a lot of money. Many people called us rich, but we certainly didn’t feel rich (or how I thought rich would feel, anyway). I went from being homeless to being a millionaire in 2 years, and I spent that money just as quickly. As I made more money, I spent more money.

My lifestyle grew with my income. I went from traveling in coach on an airplane to flying first class. I went from McDonald’s to 5-star restaurants. From JCPenney and Ross to Nordstrom. From Motel 6 to the Presidential Suite at the Waldorf Astoria in New York. From my little Hundai Excel GL to not one Mercedes-Benz, but TWO (one for me, and one the kids could ride in). I went from a small apartment to a $250,000 condo filled with expensive furniture (in a gated community, of course). I spent everything I made.

And then one day, I was embezzled from – for the second time. Ouch! I had a lot of expensive stuff, and no money. I had $50,000 in overhead each month (between payroll and business expenses), and no income.

I wish I could say I learned from this bad experience, but I didn’t. Hans and I picked ourselves back up, but a few years later, we did it all over again. This time, on a much larger scale.

We had a $900,000 mortgage. We went from no car debt to $70,000 of car debt. We went from no credit card debt to $30,000. (Do the math… that’s 1 million dollars of debt!)

Right after we spent a small fortune remodeling our third dream home, we hit some horrible, horrible hard times – again. I was diagnosed with a heart condition the same day Hans lost ALL of our life savings in the stock market.

Long story short, my first decade of making money was all about getting rich quick, only to end up with major financial failures, a lot of pain and suffering, too much stuff, tons of debt and stress I couldn’t handle.

That was all before I learned years ago a simple financial law that completely changed my finances and my life. It changed my family’s life. I have seen it change my clients’ lives.

The Law of Promotion: If you are faithful with what you are given, you will be given more. But those who are not faithful with the little they have, even what they have will be taken away.

All of this is a correction. Our government has not been faithful. Our citizens have not been faithful. So here comes the squeeze. America has over 16 trillion dollars of debt and that number is growing daily. The citizens have accumulated massive debt. In the U.S., household debt rose from nearly zero in the 1950s to $13 trillion in 2012.

My friend, which side of this equation do you want to be on? If you are on the wrong side, you must learn how to get on the right side.

It is time to position yourself as the one who will receive, because you have been faithful with what you have been given. I do not want you to face the painful correction that comes to those who are not faithful. Millions of people are out of work and on food stamps. People everywhere are hurting financially. Men, women and children are feeling the squeeze. Families are completely heartbroken because they have lost everything.

You may not have been aware of this financial law before today, but now that you know, you can begin to follow it. And I promise, there are so many blessings in store for you when you are faithful with the small things. I’ve experienced it, and I want you to experience it, as well.

Have you experienced financial correction or financial blessing? Please share your comments below and hit Share to send this message to your circle of influence.

If you are looking for more skill sets and strategies for success, join us today on The Dani Johnson Show at 12 pm ET/11 am CT. Tune into the show on either your TV or radio and please remember you can always stream today’s show right on our website.

In great faith,


P.S. Don’t keep making the same financial mistakes. Getting on the right track is easier than you think.

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